An Astrological Look at Oklahoma

by Lynn Bootes

07/29/2015

Most people know about the Sun Sign column in the newspaper, but did you know that astrologers do much more?

We look the moments when individuals or social entities come into existence, as well as natural events and economic cycles. When we know the exact time and place of birth, we can tell an amazing story. Oklahoma was “born” as a state at 10:16 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, November 16, 1907, in Washington, D.C., when President Theodore Roosevelt signed the bill of statehood into law. A minute later, in Guthrie, Oklahoma, the new governor was sworn in and a grand celebration began. As an astrologer, I look at the positions of the Sun, Moon, and visible planets and where they were in relation to the background of stars, the zodiac, and also where they were in relation to the earth. I use a very ancient traditional astrology, called Vedic astrology; although it has been kept alive in India, it is really the product of many cultures and nations. In this system, I use the “sidereal” zodiac, which actually corresponds to the stars you see at night, unlike the “tropical” zodiac you find in popular astrology in the newspaper columns. So, what do I see in the Oklahoma chart?

Oklahoma’s Horoscope

We are currently in a very conservative period—Saturn became dominant in 2004 and will continue its influence until 2023. Oklahoma has become most definitively a red state, and our legislature has become infamous for enacting conservative lost causes while ignoring pressing issues of policy and budget. We have survived the Great Recession, more tornadoes, the possibility of another oil bust, alarm over undocumented immigrants, and looming on the horizon: climate change. Finally, in 2023, Mercury returns, and I would bet we will see more focus on intellectual and technical progress as opposed to our current obsession with holding on to the past. The Dashas are a 120-year cycle; I have to wonder if Oklahoma will experience a period of political reform and liberalization at that time, similar to the first years of statehood.


Editor’s note: This is an excerpt. Read Lynn Bootes’ complete analysis of Oklahoma’s star chart in This Land: Summer 2015.