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March 3, 2015

Living Room Kitchen

by Sasha Martin

I am missing two fingerprints on my right hand. The neat spiral of lines on…
 

February 23, 2015

Grave Misgivings

This short film explores the lasting power of Geronimo’s name and image. The distinction between…
 

June 18, 2014

The Blues Big Time

by Abby Wendle

Little Joe Mclerran is a old-fashioned bluesman. He’s only 30, but he dresses like someone…
 
Own This May Be The Last Time on DVD! Tracing a heartfelt journey, award-winning filmmaker…
 

02/20/2015 | Original Okie

Grant McClintock

By This Land

In this special Original Okie double feature, we present two portraits of Grant McClintock: one snapped in 1975 by Adele Hickey and the other 40 years later in 2015 by Wendy Ford. Grant was born in Tulsa in 1947. He has lived and worked as a photographer in London, Palo Alto, New Orleans, Idaho, and Montana. He presently lives in Osage County. He has pub…

02/18/2015 | Okiecentric

Alpha and Omega

By Grant McClintock

I don’t remember life before fishing, and that’s fine with me, from what I’ve been told of it. Much of my infancy was spent in a St. John’s hospital room, recovering from one of 13 surgeries performed by good Okie doctors working with the skill and instruments available to them in 1947 to remove a blockage from my frustratingly minuscule urethra. They…

02/17/2015 | Okiecentric

Renegade Golf

By Tyler Palmateer

Cheyenne Golf Course, in Cheyenne, Oklahoma, is more reminiscent of Tom Joad than Tom Watson. It consists of nine rugged holes, ornamented at their peaks with greens made not of grass, but copper-red sand mixed with biodegradable oil. Greens with tattered, canary-yellow flags stabbed into their centers, resting a stone’s throw from the hot pavement of…

02/16/2015 | New Fiction

You Are Going to Be a Good Man

By George McCormick

The moon has been off my left shoulder for thirty-seven years and I’ve never known a blue this bad, this purple. Lots of no-woman stories, sure, simple. Lots of gone-woman stories, too. I am lost of gone woman, myself; nothing new here. But I need another story. What I don’t need is Gonewoman leaving east in a truck of her parents’ financing, driving righ…

02/13/2015 | Poetry

Queer as Folk

By Nick Weaver

& then gay marriage was legal in Oklahoma & it was renamed “Oklahomo” & cowboys went broke back & farm girl lay with farm girl & all the cows turned gay too so they weren’t feeling left out & their milk was sugary post-Fruity Pebbles breakfast flavored & wheat fields bloomed with glitter & oil drills yielded expensive…

02/11/2015 | New Fiction

It Only Got Worse

By RJ Young

All right, before you judge me, you have to understand what I was dealing with. No matter what any man will tell you, there is nothing on Earth more tempting, coveted and chased than a beautiful woman. If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, all men are messed up. Some chick named Delilah took down the strongest Israelite the world has ever known. Some chick calle…

02/08/2015 | Okiecentric

Much Love Lost

By Connie Cronley

February is the month of true love; that’s why it’s the shortest month of the year. Valentine’s Day has been a day of romance since the 14th century. The holiday originated in Europe with the belief that birds began to mate February 14. It seemed like a swell idea. Medieval men and maidens began choosing a “valentine,” or special loving friend, for t…

02/06/2015 | Original Okie

Wilber Glasby

By Sheilah Bright

Wilber Glasby knows some folks think he’s a hoarder, but he sees cash value in his eight-acre junk-strewn kingdom in Yale, Oklahoma. Deaf since birth and retired from laying railroad track, the scrap dealer says he now lives off selling old soda machines, rusty farm implements and anything else on the place. His wife, Jane, hopes American Pickers w…

02/05/2015 | Okiecentric

The Day Disaster Struck

By Connie Cronley

Watch any television newscast, read any newspaper, and you’ll know that humans are fascinated with catastrophe. Audiences seem to devour disaster information, however gruesome. It’s not simply morbid curiosity with death and destruction. Our concern involves a search for information, a study of cause and effect. We want to know how it happene…

02/04/2015 | Okiecentric

Saucers over Oklahoma

By David A. Farris

Saturday morning, July 31, 1965, at 1:05 a.m., Officer Lewis Sikes of the Wynnewood Police Department reported sighting a bright object in the sky a few miles northeast of town. He described the object as having a blue-green center, with a rotating light circling the midsection. The object abruptly rose into the night sky, where it hovered for a few minutes b…

01/29/2015 | Okiecentric

Milking It

By Jennifer Luitwieler

My mother pulled her flame-orange Pinto into the cratered lot at the entrance to our neighborhood and silently handed me three dollars. The Uni-Mart was where my friends and I rode our bikes for 25-cent candy bars and something to do. Milk cost two bucks a gallon, and the bills in my hand were my cue to run in and grab some. When my mother was a kid, she awoke to fresh…

01/28/2015 | Special Report

Tongues of Fire in Kansas

By Mike Mariani

Pentecostalism, a branch of Christianity that grew out of Protestantism in the early 20th century, has 280 million adherents worldwide. The movement is twice the size of the Baptists; three times the size of Lutheranism; and six times larger than Presbyterianism.[1] It’s almost unfathomable that the Pentecostals—often referred to as the “third…

01/27/2015 | Poetry

Fast Forward

By Warren Brown

  As we move yet one more step towards dust   Desire fades and jealousy and anguish at loves lost   And days become copies of days before and after following   The brassy sun laughs youthfully at us, reflecting from hair and skin of the young   But we are not fooled by this party of light as we know too the sun is as we   Old and dancing i…

01/23/2015 | Original Okie

Lee Lyles

By Sheilah Bright

Lee Lyles of Sulphur, Oklahoma, forged a love for heavy metal as a kid and blazed a farrier career that earned him an induction into the International Horseshoeing Hall of Fame. He’s shod horses for Elvis Presley and Loretta Lynn and amassed one of the world’s largest collections of blacksmith tools displayed at his National Museum of Horse Sho…

01/22/2015 | Okiecentric

The Murder on Turkey Creek

By Martha Buntin

In November 1876, two men met in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, and discussed their desires to cross the Indian Territory into Texas. Richard Wannamaker was preparing to drive a herd of 30 ponies into Texas, where he was possibly preparing to open a dental office. Frank Kilborn had a wagon, but was unable to secure any horses to pull his equipment into the country whe…